Danish film classic voted 3rd best Silent Film ever!

Danish film classic

Silent films had a respectable showing, as it were, on Sight & Sound magazine’s last big critics poll. The votes, cast to determine the greatest motion pictures of all time, placed three silents among the top ten overall: F.W. Murnau’s Sunrise, Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera, and Carl Theodor Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of Arc. These, of course, also rank at the top of Sight & Sound‘s separate list of the ten greatest silent films of all time, which came out as follows:

  1. Sunrise (F.W. Murnau, 1927)
  2. Man with a Movie Camer Watch Ten of the Greatest Silent Films of All Time — All Free Online a (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
  3. The Passion of Joan of Arc (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928)
  4. Battleship Potemkin (Sergei Eisenstein, 1925)
  5. The General (Buster Keaton, 1926)
  6. Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1927)
  7. City Lights (Charlie Chaplin, 1931)
  8. Sherlock Jr. (Buster Keaton, 1924)
  9. Greed (Erich von Stroheim, 1923)
  10. Un chien andalou (Luis Buñuel, 1928) and Intolerance (D.W. Griffith, 1916)

Though all of these pictures came out within the seemingly short thirteen-year span between 1916 and 1921, they represent a wide cinematic diversity: in form, in theme, in genre, in place of origin (of both the films and the filmmakers), in sensibility, in aesthetics. You probably recognize all of their names, especially if you’ve taken a film studies course, and you may think of them all as familiar, but how many have you watched? Even we avowed cinephiles have a way of tricking ourselves into believing we’ve seen all the most important movies in their entirety, when in reality we know only about, albeit sometimes a lot about, their place in the history of cinema and their currents of influence that flow into films made today.

Danish film classic